Full Moon Water and Standing Rock Ceremony

IMG_1733

Medicine Water Wheel at Frenchy’s Park

Prayers and Vigil for Standing Rock
and Full Moon
at the
Medicine Water Wheel in Frenchy’s
Park, Santa Fe, beside the footbridge
over the Santa Fe River.
Monday 14th November 2016 at
5:00 PM

Phoenix Sanchez will be leading us in a Fire
and Water Ceremony

Phoenix has experience leading ceremonies in many traditions, including Lakota, South American Shamanic, Native Curandera and Jewish traditions. You are welcome to bring your own prayers, offerings, special water and flavor to add to the mix

Please note to come early, before 5 PM as it will be just after sunset and getting dark. We changed the time from 5:30 to 5:00PM
It is fine if you have to come a little late

Dress Very Warmly, bring Water to bless

Call Raphael (575) 770 1228 for more details

Ceremony for the Waters

We will be supporting this Ceremony for the Waters on Saturday and bringing some of the polluted water to our Medicine Water Ceremony on Sunday 19th at 6 PM at Frenchy’s Park.
Saturday, June 18, 9:00 am
 
TWO-MILE DAM
Santa Fe Canyon Preserve
Cerro Grande & Upper Canyon Rd
Be part of a worldwide event!

Making beauty for
Earth’s wounded places
BRING: Water, offerings, drums, songs, flowers
INFO: Liz Gold, lizg.nm@gmail.com
 

Medicine Water Wheel Schedule 2016

Medicine Water Wheel Schedule 2016

There will be a Medicine Water Wheel ceremony in Frenchy’s Park for the Full Moon on Sunday  19th June at 6 PM to bless the Full Moon, Summer Solstice and Father’s Day. Hope you can make it.  Please join us. Here is the schedule for the upcoming water wheel ceremonies for the rest of the year:

WaterWheel

Upcoming HeartThread, Water, Ceremonies

Annual Seed Exchange Tuesday, March 15th @ the Frenchy’s Barn from 3:00 – 6:00 pm

BRING YOUR SEEDS

Jessie Esparza, Parks Project Specialist  505-955-2106

HeartThread Intro evening on wednesday 16th March at Amata Chiropractic, 826 Camino de Monte Rey, Suite A3, Santa Fe  6 – 8 PM . Free

HeartThread Practitioner Training: There will not be a training this coming weekend of the 18th, 19th 20th, March. The next training to become a  HeartThread Practitioner will be held on April 29th, 30th and May 1st in Bernalillo, NM

Equinox Celebration and Ceremony at La Cocina de Balam, 1406 3rd Street, Santa Fe, Sunday, March  20th  2 – 6 PM. Dress warmly bring water, crystal, dirt from your home. Feast provided by donation (505) 316 4913

HeartThread workshop at La Cocina de Balam, Sunday April 24th from 2 – 5 PM $21

Info on any of the above Raphael (575) 770 1228

Message from Marian Naranjo a tribal member of Kha po Owingeh, Santa Clara Pueblo

Umbi A: gin di (With you respect)

My name is Marian Naranjo a tribal member of Kha po Owingeh, Santa Clara Pueblo.

From my perspective as an Indigenous person from here I would like to share one of our teachings with you. In our prayers and stories, we always mention the four directions in which these directions have names and have been passed down in all aspects of our cultural teachings for millennium. From a place in southern Colorado, a place within the Jemez Mountains, south to Albuquerque and East a place within the Sangre De Christos, including the lifeblood water source that runs thru the center of these points. These are the cardinal, ancestral to present points of the Tewa World. Within this area, we believe the Creator had placed the first Peoples here, with a plan. The plan was composed of process and mannerisms that formed lifeways of sustainability and in giving thanks for Creators gifts of land, air and water. This place is our church, Our Heaven. Great understanding was developed, practiced, lived and a spiritual practice daily was and is performed in honor of this, since the beginning.

As time passed, many changes occurred. The 1st Peoples were forced to adapt to changes, while all along maintaining process and mannerisms and the belief that only when we take care of the land, air and water, it will take care of us.

Seventy years ago, the United States Government, the army and scientists gave themselves permission through the Wars Powers Act to plant themselves within the west wall of our church. These entities belief system had no conscious awareness of taking care of the land, air and water and had no conscious awareness of caring, loving, respecting and helping those of us whose sacred place they entered. The Indigenous Peoples were forced into change, adaptation, while still trying desperately to maintain the Creators plan. Through need for survival we were forced into feeding that energy of the unseen in an unsacred way. This opened the door for others to come and enter innocently in a disrespectful manner.

So, here we are, gathered together here in the Tewa World, in only one of the Creators sacred places. In this country, the United States; these destructive forces have planted themselves on or near over 24 different Native reservations, places that are sacred to the Peoples. These places were meant to be in harmony with all that is living, and now, covered over by intentions of mass destruction. This weapon has been used intentionally to destroy people. Here in New Mexico, the Trinity Test, where no one was told to protect themselves and this plume of poison went everywhere. Then, our brothers and sisters of Japan the reason we are gathered for this commemoration. More than 500 above ground tests have occurred around the world. This knowledge has gone full circle, which brings us back to the Tewa World.

At this time, I would like each and every one of you to join me in making a conscious acknowledgment of where we are. Then, make a conscious decision of which energy of the unseen do we wish to feed; the life giving forces of the ancestral spirit world or the destructive forces of mass destruction? To further explain, to feed, is a term used in the action of spiritual connection to energy.

We all have energy, within and around ourselves. First, ground yourself with thoughts of where you are, we are here in the Tewa World, Oga Pogeh, a sacred area since time immemorial. Take this thought from your mind to your heart, become comfortable with it. Feel it, connect yourself with this unseen energy that was placed here by the Creator. Give thanks for your life. Be happy with this thought. Be happy with this feeling. Concentrate and feed this positive energy with your presence. Connect with the ancestors. Have no doubt of their presence! Ask for permission to be among them and ask for their help to restore our Mother..Grounding oneself in this practice, especially as you walk near or within the west wall of this sacred church, will allow the ancestral spirits to awaken and they will be fed. Try your best to ignore the presence of the negative, in some ways it’s difficult. But try not to invite it in with rhetoric or acknowledgment of its existence. Don’t feed it!

During this time of our Pueblo calendar, we are in prayer mode in preparation for cultural happenings. Instead of changing this mode to be on this panel, we decided to bring this and share with you a little bit of our mannerism and ask you to join us in taking action using the mannerism of the Tewa People. This action is with the unseen that will offer empowerment and an opportunity for us to enter right relationship with each other on this land with dealing with the issues at hand, that being abolishing nuclear weapons. I had a vision or a dream, of our Pueblo Governors offices being flooded with letters of acknowledgement and heartfelt prayers from those who stand in solidarity for the care of this land; prayers that lifted the spirits of our People, prayers that weave connection and allow one to lay their burdens down and move into a time of great healing.

For over twenty years, I along with other Tewa people have participated in these types of gatherings of protest to abolish nuclear weapons, today I ask for your support and try participating in a different manner, a manner in which the pueblo people are more comfortable with and accustomed to.

I invite you to write these letters of prayer, acknowledge your presence and let the tribal leaders know that you are aware that you live or work within the boundaries of this sacred place. Acknowledge how blessed you are to be here. Let them know you that you too, hold gratitude to the Creator for this land and pray for clean land, air and water. And that you pray for no more nuclear weapons are produced in this sacred area and that through serving the life giving energies, real Peace will come to the World.

Today we have good spirited people here who support this action and are here to help with letters of prayer. Please join us in this effort and let’s see where it goes.

Kuda Wa Ha; aa many blessings to you all.

Marian Naranjo a tribal member of Kha po Owingeh, Santa Clara Pueblo

*************************

You are invited to take a moment to express your heartfelt prayer letting the Tribal Leaders of the Northern Pueblos know that you are aware that you are inside the lands they hold sacred, their church; and letting them know that you stand in solidarity with them for the care of these lands.

Sending your prayer has the power to weave connection with the People who have lived here long before our arrival. Entering right relationship with them and this land will allow all of us to lay our burdens down and move into a time of great healing.

Allow your heart to speak as you acknowledge your presence here within the church of the Tewa world and let the tribal leaders know how your life is blessed to be here.

Let them know that you too hold gratitude to the Creator for this land and pray for clean land, air and water.

Let them know that you pray no more nuclear weapons will be produced in this sacred area and that through serving life-giving energies, real Peace will come for us all.

Please write your prayer and email or mail it to HOPE. Your prayer will be copied and sent to the Tribal Leaders. Thank you!

 

Honor Our Pueblo Existence (HOPE)

627 Flower Road

Espanola, New Mexico 87532 mariann2@windstream.net

“These prayers are about now and going forward with the acknowledgement of where we are. It is vital in planting the seeds for healing in this place that acknowledgment of place, what this place is to its inhabitants and incorporating prayer which is the mannerism for sacredness and for healing. Once this is established, it will be understood how our story of the Atomic Age needs to begin.

In the meantime, gathering the stories of the history can and should be done. This story is painful, which is another reason for the prayers to be gathered and sent, so that we don’t get stuck in the past and be able to forge forward to include our story which will make the present stories about the Atomic Age that are being presented complete and truthful, for the benefit of future generations.”   Marian Naranjo of Santa Clara

World Water War I: Already Under Way

 Thanks for this from Herb Farmer

World Water War I: Already Under Way

A common misconception: the wars of the future will be fought, not with water, but over it. There will be a lot of them. Soon. (Photo by Radio Free Asia)

The stresses that are rearranging the world’s maps, uprooting populations, destroying nation-states and destabilizing the planet have less to do with extreme “-isms,” geopolitics, hegemony or nuclear armaments than they do with water. Overuse, misuse and pollution of water, combined with spreading drought, a consequence of climate change, are imposing on larger and larger regions of the world an inexorable sequence of deprivation leading to desperation, then disintegration. About halfway through the progression, as desperation begins to bring on disintegration, the violence begins, and from then on the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse ride hard.

The increasing scarcity of water is the unacknowledged cause of the so-called Arab Spring collapses of the governments of Tunisia, Libya and Egypt. It was the spark that lit the fuse of the rebellions in Syria (when protesters in Daraa protested corrupt allocations of scarce water) and Yemen (when citizens of Taiz, the thirstiest city in the country, erupted in 2011).

It is only when we recognize this causality (keeping in mind that high costs, and scarcity, of food are almost always a consequence of scarce water) that we can appreciate how much trouble we are in. What happened to these failed and failing states is under way in:

The list of countries approaching mortal crisis because of water scarcity goes on, and on. It has to include California, Arizona and Nevada, states whose mummification by dry desert air is proceeding apace.

In the shadow of this real and present danger to the world, politicians and talking heads continue to prattle about religion, ideology, ethnicity, world domination — indeed, any distraction imaginable — apparently to avoid having to confront reality. Despite their best efforts at obfuscation, however, it is clear that reality is about to confront us.   

“…Like A War Zone”: Worries About Increased Oil Drilling

“…Like A War Zone”: Worries About Increased Oil Drilling

Sarah Jane White, with her grandson, worries that someday, children won't be able to find clean water on the Navajo reservation.

Sarah Jane White, with her grandson, worries that someday, children won’t be able to find clean water on the Navajo reservation.
Credit Laura Paskus
Listen
Listening…
4:15

Sarah Jane White’s walking to the top of a sandy hill near the eastern edge of the Navajo reservation. Along the way, she points to footprints in the sand. Her 4-year-old grandson, Albino, crouches to look. She shows him the prints of a horse, then a cow. Each time, he’s delighted.

It’s sunny and warm, though just a few days before the official start of winter. We walk past juniper trees, an old sweat lodge. Albino powers across the sandstone arroyo and on up the hill. The sky’s a deep blue. And depending on the breeze, the air smells like either sage or pine.

“Right now, there’s healthy people living here,” says White. “The air is fresh. It’s clean.”

White and her relatives are “allottees,” Navajo people living on lands deeded to them by the federal government.

The federal government deferred new oil leases near Chaco Canyon National Historical Park last month. But many people who live here are still worried about how development outside the park will affect their communities, their landscapes, and their children’s futures.

If you’ve driven Highway 550 between Cuba and Farmington recently, you’ve seen the oil rigs and flares on federal allotments along the road near Lybrook and Counselor.

But people like White – people who live here – seem surprised to see how fast things have changed. “When they’re done sucking everything out, everybody’s going to pack up and leave and leave their trash behind,” she says. “Nobody’s going to clean it up. That’s what bothers me.”

Credit Laura Paskus

At the top of the hill, White looks out, across the landscape. From here, she can see four different wells in the distance. “I see the landscape looks really beautiful, but when you see all these oil tanks and fields, that’s not beautiful,” she says. “The flare, that doesn’t look good at all. And if we don’t stop this, it’s going to be all over the place.”

In the past two years, the U.S. Bureau of Land Management has approved more than 100 new exploratory wells around here. Companies like Encana Corporation and WPX Energy have come in, offering tens of thousands of dollars to allottees willing to have a well on their lands.

Credit Laura Paskus

Each well pad has its own road, waste pond, and tanks. During drilling, pickup trucks and semi-trucks run up and down the roads 24 hours a day.

Lori Goodman directs the nonprofit, Diné CARE – Diné Citizens Against Ruining Our Environment. “The leases are being sold… grandma and grandpa are selling their leases, they get $60,000, $80,000. They’ve never seen money like that, and they’re not understanding the value of it, even.”

Oftentimes, she explains, people don’t understand what they’re signing, and they don’t understand what’s going to happen on their lands.

That’s also a one-time payment – even if the well runs for decades.

Many Navajo people who live here are upset that the roads leading to their homes are being ripped up by semi-trucks. They’re afraid of fracking fluids. They don’t know what’s coming out of the flares. And they worry about blowouts and accidents that happen far – very far – from emergency services.

Victoria Gutierrez is Sarah Jane White’s daughter. “Especially at night, it’s enough to make you just cry. One of the ladies (said it) looks like a war zone. It’s just completely lit up,” she says. “All you see is flames everywhere, you smell that gas, that burning, it’s just ugly.”

Guttierrez knows that the wells mean money: lots of cash for people working in the fields, and depending on land ownership and jurisdiction, hundreds of millions of dollars for the state of New Mexico, the federal government, or the Navajo Nation tribal government and millions more in profits for the oil companies.

But she’s angry that Navajo people are living with the trucks and the flares, the noise and the fear.

“I think indigenous people, Navajos, we’ve been pushed around enough. We were forced to live on land no one wanted, (and) now everyone wants it because we’re full of natural resources,” she says. “It’s not right. And so, leave it where it’s at. Leave it where it’s at. That’s what I say.”

Guttierrez’s mom, Sarah Jane White, says Navajo people live where they are born. “Like, if I was born here,” she says, pointing to the ground between her feet, “I would live here. And I would die here. And I would want to be buried here. You don’t leave your homeland.”

That’s why they are fighting, she says. Because what happens now will still matter to the children born here in a century.

***

Forwarded by Leslie Lakind from

Charlotte Levinson, President

The Max & Anna Levinson Foundation
P.O. Box 6309, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87502
505-995-8802  levinsonfoundation.org