Full Moon Water and Standing Rock Ceremony

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Medicine Water Wheel at Frenchy’s Park

Prayers and Vigil for Standing Rock
and Full Moon
at the
Medicine Water Wheel in Frenchy’s
Park, Santa Fe, beside the footbridge
over the Santa Fe River.
Monday 14th November 2016 at
5:00 PM

Phoenix Sanchez will be leading us in a Fire
and Water Ceremony

Phoenix has experience leading ceremonies in many traditions, including Lakota, South American Shamanic, Native Curandera and Jewish traditions. You are welcome to bring your own prayers, offerings, special water and flavor to add to the mix

Please note to come early, before 5 PM as it will be just after sunset and getting dark. We changed the time from 5:30 to 5:00PM
It is fine if you have to come a little late

Dress Very Warmly, bring Water to bless

Call Raphael (575) 770 1228 for more details

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Ceremony for the Waters

We will be supporting this Ceremony for the Waters on Saturday and bringing some of the polluted water to our Medicine Water Ceremony on Sunday 19th at 6 PM at Frenchy’s Park.
Saturday, June 18, 9:00 am
 
TWO-MILE DAM
Santa Fe Canyon Preserve
Cerro Grande & Upper Canyon Rd
Be part of a worldwide event!

Making beauty for
Earth’s wounded places
BRING: Water, offerings, drums, songs, flowers
INFO: Liz Gold, lizg.nm@gmail.com
 

Medicine Water Wheel Schedule 2016

Medicine Water Wheel Schedule 2016

There will be a Medicine Water Wheel ceremony in Frenchy’s Park for the Full Moon on Sunday  19th June at 6 PM to bless the Full Moon, Summer Solstice and Father’s Day. Hope you can make it.  Please join us. Here is the schedule for the upcoming water wheel ceremonies for the rest of the year:

WaterWheel

fluoride causes cancer

http://www.naturalnews.com/053953_fluoride_cancer_water_safety.html

Undeniable evidence from numerous studies proves that fluoride causes cancer

Monday, May 09, 2016 by: Ethan A. Huff, staff writer
(NaturalNews) The California Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) recently released a document called Evidence on the Carcinogenicity of Fluoride and Its Salts that highlights the many health hazards caused by the consumption of fluoride. And the Fluoride Action Network (FAN) recently submitted a compilation of its own to OEHHA, which is soon to make a final decision concerning fluoride’s toxicity, providing additional evidence that fluoride causes cancer.

FAN has been working for many years to raise awareness about the toxicity of fluoride, with the eventual goal of getting it removed from public water supplies. And its most recent efforts involving OEHHA could be the straw that breaks the camel’s back, so to speak, as it has the potential to unleash the truth about fluoride on a massive scale, and spark a revolt against its use.

According to a recent FAN press release, OEHHA’s report was birthed out of an inquiry into the science of fluoride’s toxicity. It is also a prelude to the group’s scientific advisory board Carcinogen Identification Committee (CIC) meeting to be held on October 12 – 13, 2011, which will make a decision on the status of fluoride as a carcinogen.

The OEHHA report already states that “multiple lines of evidence (show) that fluoride is incorporated into bones where it can stimulate cell division of osteoblasts [bone-forming cells],” an admission that already recognizes fluoride as a cause of bone cancer. The report goes on to state that fluoride induces “genetic changes other cellular changes leading to malignant transformation, and cellular immune response thereby increasing the risk of development of osteosarcomas.”

To add to this, FAN presented OEHHA with additional studies from the National Research Council (NRC), the National Toxicology Program (NTP), and several esteemed universities that all illustrate a link between fluoride consumption and various cancers, including liver and oral cancers, and thyroid follicular cell tumors.

With this mountain of evidence, the only logical conclusion OEHHA can come to in October is that fluoride is a toxic poison — and just like lead and other known toxic chemicals already are in California, worthy of being publicly identified as dangerous.

“While we understand that there will be tremendous pressure put on the CIC and OEHHA by the proponents of fluoride and fluoridation, we ask that the Committee continue to rely on its high level of scientific knowledge and integrity when deliberating and reaching a final conclusion on the carcinogenicity status of fluoride and its salts,” wrote FAN as part of its official submission.

To read the entire FAN press release, which contains further details about the cancer studies included, visit:

http://www.prnewswire.com

Upcoming HeartThread, Water, Ceremonies

Annual Seed Exchange Tuesday, March 15th @ the Frenchy’s Barn from 3:00 – 6:00 pm

BRING YOUR SEEDS

Jessie Esparza, Parks Project Specialist  505-955-2106

HeartThread Intro evening on wednesday 16th March at Amata Chiropractic, 826 Camino de Monte Rey, Suite A3, Santa Fe  6 – 8 PM . Free

HeartThread Practitioner Training: There will not be a training this coming weekend of the 18th, 19th 20th, March. The next training to become a  HeartThread Practitioner will be held on April 29th, 30th and May 1st in Bernalillo, NM

Equinox Celebration and Ceremony at La Cocina de Balam, 1406 3rd Street, Santa Fe, Sunday, March  20th  2 – 6 PM. Dress warmly bring water, crystal, dirt from your home. Feast provided by donation (505) 316 4913

HeartThread workshop at La Cocina de Balam, Sunday April 24th from 2 – 5 PM $21

Info on any of the above Raphael (575) 770 1228

Message from Marian Naranjo a tribal member of Kha po Owingeh, Santa Clara Pueblo

Umbi A: gin di (With you respect)

My name is Marian Naranjo a tribal member of Kha po Owingeh, Santa Clara Pueblo.

From my perspective as an Indigenous person from here I would like to share one of our teachings with you. In our prayers and stories, we always mention the four directions in which these directions have names and have been passed down in all aspects of our cultural teachings for millennium. From a place in southern Colorado, a place within the Jemez Mountains, south to Albuquerque and East a place within the Sangre De Christos, including the lifeblood water source that runs thru the center of these points. These are the cardinal, ancestral to present points of the Tewa World. Within this area, we believe the Creator had placed the first Peoples here, with a plan. The plan was composed of process and mannerisms that formed lifeways of sustainability and in giving thanks for Creators gifts of land, air and water. This place is our church, Our Heaven. Great understanding was developed, practiced, lived and a spiritual practice daily was and is performed in honor of this, since the beginning.

As time passed, many changes occurred. The 1st Peoples were forced to adapt to changes, while all along maintaining process and mannerisms and the belief that only when we take care of the land, air and water, it will take care of us.

Seventy years ago, the United States Government, the army and scientists gave themselves permission through the Wars Powers Act to plant themselves within the west wall of our church. These entities belief system had no conscious awareness of taking care of the land, air and water and had no conscious awareness of caring, loving, respecting and helping those of us whose sacred place they entered. The Indigenous Peoples were forced into change, adaptation, while still trying desperately to maintain the Creators plan. Through need for survival we were forced into feeding that energy of the unseen in an unsacred way. This opened the door for others to come and enter innocently in a disrespectful manner.

So, here we are, gathered together here in the Tewa World, in only one of the Creators sacred places. In this country, the United States; these destructive forces have planted themselves on or near over 24 different Native reservations, places that are sacred to the Peoples. These places were meant to be in harmony with all that is living, and now, covered over by intentions of mass destruction. This weapon has been used intentionally to destroy people. Here in New Mexico, the Trinity Test, where no one was told to protect themselves and this plume of poison went everywhere. Then, our brothers and sisters of Japan the reason we are gathered for this commemoration. More than 500 above ground tests have occurred around the world. This knowledge has gone full circle, which brings us back to the Tewa World.

At this time, I would like each and every one of you to join me in making a conscious acknowledgment of where we are. Then, make a conscious decision of which energy of the unseen do we wish to feed; the life giving forces of the ancestral spirit world or the destructive forces of mass destruction? To further explain, to feed, is a term used in the action of spiritual connection to energy.

We all have energy, within and around ourselves. First, ground yourself with thoughts of where you are, we are here in the Tewa World, Oga Pogeh, a sacred area since time immemorial. Take this thought from your mind to your heart, become comfortable with it. Feel it, connect yourself with this unseen energy that was placed here by the Creator. Give thanks for your life. Be happy with this thought. Be happy with this feeling. Concentrate and feed this positive energy with your presence. Connect with the ancestors. Have no doubt of their presence! Ask for permission to be among them and ask for their help to restore our Mother..Grounding oneself in this practice, especially as you walk near or within the west wall of this sacred church, will allow the ancestral spirits to awaken and they will be fed. Try your best to ignore the presence of the negative, in some ways it’s difficult. But try not to invite it in with rhetoric or acknowledgment of its existence. Don’t feed it!

During this time of our Pueblo calendar, we are in prayer mode in preparation for cultural happenings. Instead of changing this mode to be on this panel, we decided to bring this and share with you a little bit of our mannerism and ask you to join us in taking action using the mannerism of the Tewa People. This action is with the unseen that will offer empowerment and an opportunity for us to enter right relationship with each other on this land with dealing with the issues at hand, that being abolishing nuclear weapons. I had a vision or a dream, of our Pueblo Governors offices being flooded with letters of acknowledgement and heartfelt prayers from those who stand in solidarity for the care of this land; prayers that lifted the spirits of our People, prayers that weave connection and allow one to lay their burdens down and move into a time of great healing.

For over twenty years, I along with other Tewa people have participated in these types of gatherings of protest to abolish nuclear weapons, today I ask for your support and try participating in a different manner, a manner in which the pueblo people are more comfortable with and accustomed to.

I invite you to write these letters of prayer, acknowledge your presence and let the tribal leaders know that you are aware that you live or work within the boundaries of this sacred place. Acknowledge how blessed you are to be here. Let them know you that you too, hold gratitude to the Creator for this land and pray for clean land, air and water. And that you pray for no more nuclear weapons are produced in this sacred area and that through serving the life giving energies, real Peace will come to the World.

Today we have good spirited people here who support this action and are here to help with letters of prayer. Please join us in this effort and let’s see where it goes.

Kuda Wa Ha; aa many blessings to you all.

Marian Naranjo a tribal member of Kha po Owingeh, Santa Clara Pueblo

*************************

You are invited to take a moment to express your heartfelt prayer letting the Tribal Leaders of the Northern Pueblos know that you are aware that you are inside the lands they hold sacred, their church; and letting them know that you stand in solidarity with them for the care of these lands.

Sending your prayer has the power to weave connection with the People who have lived here long before our arrival. Entering right relationship with them and this land will allow all of us to lay our burdens down and move into a time of great healing.

Allow your heart to speak as you acknowledge your presence here within the church of the Tewa world and let the tribal leaders know how your life is blessed to be here.

Let them know that you too hold gratitude to the Creator for this land and pray for clean land, air and water.

Let them know that you pray no more nuclear weapons will be produced in this sacred area and that through serving life-giving energies, real Peace will come for us all.

Please write your prayer and email or mail it to HOPE. Your prayer will be copied and sent to the Tribal Leaders. Thank you!

 

Honor Our Pueblo Existence (HOPE)

627 Flower Road

Espanola, New Mexico 87532 mariann2@windstream.net

“These prayers are about now and going forward with the acknowledgement of where we are. It is vital in planting the seeds for healing in this place that acknowledgment of place, what this place is to its inhabitants and incorporating prayer which is the mannerism for sacredness and for healing. Once this is established, it will be understood how our story of the Atomic Age needs to begin.

In the meantime, gathering the stories of the history can and should be done. This story is painful, which is another reason for the prayers to be gathered and sent, so that we don’t get stuck in the past and be able to forge forward to include our story which will make the present stories about the Atomic Age that are being presented complete and truthful, for the benefit of future generations.”   Marian Naranjo of Santa Clara

The California Drought Is Just the Beginning of Our National Water Emergency

The California Drought Is Just the Beginning of Our National Water Emergency
For years, Americans dismissed dire water shortages as a problem of the Global South. Now the crisis is coming home.
By
Maude Barlow
July 15, 2015 in The Nation

A tire rests on the dry bed of Lake Mendocino, a key Mendocino County reservoir, in Ukiah, California February 25, 2014. (Noah Berger/Reuters)

The United Nations reports that we have 15 years to avert a full-blown water crisis and that, by 2030, demand for water will outstrip supply by 40 percent. Five hundred renowned scientists brought together by UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said that our collective abuse of water has caused the earth to enter a “new geologic age,” a “planetary transformation” akin to the retreat of the glaciers more than 11,000 years ago. Already, they reported, a majority of the world’s population lives within a 30-mile radius of water sources that are badly stressed or running out.

For a long time, we in the Global North, especially North America and Europe, have seen the growing water crisis as an issue of the Global South. Certainly, the grim UN statistics on those without access to water and sanitation have referred mostly to poor countries in Africa, Latin America, and large parts of Asia. Heartbreaking images of children dying of waterborne disease have always seemed to come from the slums of Nairobi, Kolkata, or La Paz. Similarly, the worst stories of water pollution and shortages have originated in the densely populated areas of the South.

But as this issue of The Nation shows us, the global water crisis is just that—global—in every sense of the word. A deadly combination of growing inequality, climate change, rising water prices, and mismanagement of water sources in the North has suddenly put the world on a more even footing.

There is now a Third World in the First World. Growing poverty in rich countries has created an underclass that cannot pay rising water rates. As reported by Circle of Blue, the price of water in 30 major US cities is rising faster than most other household staples—41 percent since 2010, with no end in sight. As a result, increasing numbers cannot pay their water bills, and cutoffs are growing across the country. Inner-city Detroit reminds me more of the slums of Bogotá than the North American cities of my childhood.

Historic poverty and unemployment in Europe have also put millions at risk. Caught between unaffordable rising water rates and the imposition of European-wide austerity measures, thousands of families in Spain, Portugal, and Greece have had their water service cut off. An employee of the water utility Veolia Eau was fired for refusing to cut supplies to 1,000 families in Avignon, France.

As in the Global South, the trend of privatizing water services has placed an added burden on the poor of the North. Food and Water Watch and other organizations have clearly documented that the rates for water and sewer services rise dramatically with privatization. Unlike government water agencies, corporate-run water services must make a profit for their involvement.

And, as in the Global South, aging pipes and leaking water systems are not being repaired or upgraded by Northern municipalities, which have become increasingly cash-strapped as public funds dry up. It is estimated that the United States needs to spend $1 trillion over the next twenty-five years for water infrastructure. To pay for this in a time of tax-cutting hysteria, it is likely that the burden will fall on families and small businesses, pushing water rates even higher.

Climate change is another equalizing phenomenon. Melting glaciers, warming watersheds, and chaotic weather patterns are upsetting the water cycle everywhere. Higher temperatures increase the amount of moisture that evaporates from land and water; a warmer atmosphere then releases more precipitation in areas already prone to flooding and less in areas prone to drought. Indeed, drought is intensifying in many parts of the world, and deserts are growing in more than 100 countries.

Additionally, the relentless over-extraction of groundwater and water from rivers has caused great damage in the Global South and is now doing the same in the North. A June 2015 NASA study found that 21 of the world’s 37 largest aquifers—in locations from India and China to the United States and France—have passed their sustainability tipping points, putting hundreds of millions at risk. Stunningly, more than half the rivers in China have disappeared since 1990. Asia’s Aral Sea and Africa’s Lake Chad—once the fourth- and sixth-largest lakes in the world, respectively—have all but dried up due to unremitting use for export-oriented crop irrigation.

We need to change our relationship to water, and we need to do this quickly.

In Brazil, almost 2 trillion gallons of water are extracted every year to produce sugarcane ethanol. Cutting down the Amazon rain forests has dramatically reduced the amount of rain in the hydrologic cycle. Healthy rain forests produce massive amounts of moisture that are carried on air currents called “flying rivers” and supply rain to São Paulo thousands of miles away. The destruction of the rain forests and groundwater mining for biofuels has created a killing drought in a country once considered the most water-rich in the world. Not surprisingly, large-scale cutoffs and water rationing are taking a toll on millions of poor Brazilians.

The story repeats itself in the North. According to the US Department of Agriculture, the Ogallala Aquifer is so overburdened that it “is going to run out…beyond reasonable argument.” The use of bore-well technology to draw precious groundwater for the production of water-intensive corn ethanol is a large part of this story. For decades, California has massively engineered its water systems through pipelines, canals, and aqueducts so that a small number of powerful farmers in places like the Central Valley can produce water-intensive crops for export. Over-extraction is also putting huge pressure on the Great Lakes, whose receding shorelines tell the story.

* * *

There is some good news along with these distressing reports. An organized international movement has come together to fight for water justice, both globally and at the grassroots level. It has fought fiercely against privatization, with extraordinary results: Europe’s Transnational Institute reports that in the last 15 years, 235 municipalities in 37 countries have brought their water services back under public control after having tried various forms of privatization. In the United States alone, activists have reversed 58 water-privatization schemes.

This movement has also successfully fought for UN recognition that water and sanitation are human rights. The General Assembly adopted a resolution recognizing these rights on July 28, 2010, and the Human Rights Council adopted a further resolution outlining the obligations of governments two months later.

Working with communities in the Global South, where water tables are being destroyed to provide boutique water for export, North American water-justice activists have set up bottled-water-free campuses across the United States and Canada. They have also joined hands to fight water-destructive industries such as fracking here and open-pit mining in Latin America and Africa.

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The most important defining feature of this movement is that it is based on solidarity. The same mix of issues confronts the Global North and South alike, and it’s only through respect and the sharing of resources, tactics, and information that we will bring water justice to communities around the world. Water activists increasingly understand that many of the assaults target indigenous lands, and that indigenous leadership and solidarity are key to the success of this movement.

It has now become time for governments around the world to step up and take serious action. It is utterly astonishing to me that, with the many (and growing) water crises across the United States, the issue of water does not come up in presidential campaigns. Energy, yes—water, no.

We humans have used the planet’s fresh water for our pleasure and profit, and created an industrial model of development based on conquering nature. It is time to see water as the essential element of an ecosystem that gives life to us all, and that we must protect with vigor and determination. We need to change our relationship to water, and do it quickly. We must do everything in our power to heal and restore the planet’s watersheds and waterways.

In practice, this means we need a new ethic that puts water and its protection at the center of all of the laws and policies we enact. The world would be a very different place if we always asked how our water practices—everything from trading across borders to growing food and producing energy—affect our most valuable resource.

Water must be much more equitably shared, and governments must guarantee access by making it a public service provided on a not-for-profit basis. The human right to water must become a reality everywhere. Likewise, water plunder must end: Governments need to stand up to the powerful industries, private interests, and bad practices destroying water all over the world. Water everywhere must be declared a public trust, to be protected and managed for the public good. This includes placing priorities on access to limited supplies, especially groundwater, and banning private industry from owning or controlling it. Water, in short, must be recognized as the common heritage of humanity and of future generations.

The global water crisis now unites us in a common struggle. Will its scarcity lead to conflict, violence, and war? Or it is possible that water will become a negotiating tool for cooperation and peace? Can it be nature’s gift to teach us how to better live with one another and tread more lightly on Mother Earth?

I surely hope so.
Maude Barlow, who chairs the boards of Food and Water Watch and the Council of Canadians, served as senior adviser on water to the 63rd president of the UN General Assembly. Her latest book is Blue Future: Protecting Water for People and the Planet Forever.