Medicine Water Wheel Schedule 2016

Medicine Water Wheel Schedule 2016

There will be a Medicine Water Wheel ceremony in Frenchy’s Park for the Full Moon on Sunday  19th June at 6 PM to bless the Full Moon, Summer Solstice and Father’s Day. Hope you can make it.  Please join us. Here is the schedule for the upcoming water wheel ceremonies for the rest of the year:

WaterWheel

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“…Like A War Zone”: Worries About Increased Oil Drilling

“…Like A War Zone”: Worries About Increased Oil Drilling

Sarah Jane White, with her grandson, worries that someday, children won't be able to find clean water on the Navajo reservation.

Sarah Jane White, with her grandson, worries that someday, children won’t be able to find clean water on the Navajo reservation.
Credit Laura Paskus
Listen
Listening…
4:15

Sarah Jane White’s walking to the top of a sandy hill near the eastern edge of the Navajo reservation. Along the way, she points to footprints in the sand. Her 4-year-old grandson, Albino, crouches to look. She shows him the prints of a horse, then a cow. Each time, he’s delighted.

It’s sunny and warm, though just a few days before the official start of winter. We walk past juniper trees, an old sweat lodge. Albino powers across the sandstone arroyo and on up the hill. The sky’s a deep blue. And depending on the breeze, the air smells like either sage or pine.

“Right now, there’s healthy people living here,” says White. “The air is fresh. It’s clean.”

White and her relatives are “allottees,” Navajo people living on lands deeded to them by the federal government.

The federal government deferred new oil leases near Chaco Canyon National Historical Park last month. But many people who live here are still worried about how development outside the park will affect their communities, their landscapes, and their children’s futures.

If you’ve driven Highway 550 between Cuba and Farmington recently, you’ve seen the oil rigs and flares on federal allotments along the road near Lybrook and Counselor.

But people like White – people who live here – seem surprised to see how fast things have changed. “When they’re done sucking everything out, everybody’s going to pack up and leave and leave their trash behind,” she says. “Nobody’s going to clean it up. That’s what bothers me.”

Credit Laura Paskus

At the top of the hill, White looks out, across the landscape. From here, she can see four different wells in the distance. “I see the landscape looks really beautiful, but when you see all these oil tanks and fields, that’s not beautiful,” she says. “The flare, that doesn’t look good at all. And if we don’t stop this, it’s going to be all over the place.”

In the past two years, the U.S. Bureau of Land Management has approved more than 100 new exploratory wells around here. Companies like Encana Corporation and WPX Energy have come in, offering tens of thousands of dollars to allottees willing to have a well on their lands.

Credit Laura Paskus

Each well pad has its own road, waste pond, and tanks. During drilling, pickup trucks and semi-trucks run up and down the roads 24 hours a day.

Lori Goodman directs the nonprofit, Diné CARE – Diné Citizens Against Ruining Our Environment. “The leases are being sold… grandma and grandpa are selling their leases, they get $60,000, $80,000. They’ve never seen money like that, and they’re not understanding the value of it, even.”

Oftentimes, she explains, people don’t understand what they’re signing, and they don’t understand what’s going to happen on their lands.

That’s also a one-time payment – even if the well runs for decades.

Many Navajo people who live here are upset that the roads leading to their homes are being ripped up by semi-trucks. They’re afraid of fracking fluids. They don’t know what’s coming out of the flares. And they worry about blowouts and accidents that happen far – very far – from emergency services.

Victoria Gutierrez is Sarah Jane White’s daughter. “Especially at night, it’s enough to make you just cry. One of the ladies (said it) looks like a war zone. It’s just completely lit up,” she says. “All you see is flames everywhere, you smell that gas, that burning, it’s just ugly.”

Guttierrez knows that the wells mean money: lots of cash for people working in the fields, and depending on land ownership and jurisdiction, hundreds of millions of dollars for the state of New Mexico, the federal government, or the Navajo Nation tribal government and millions more in profits for the oil companies.

But she’s angry that Navajo people are living with the trucks and the flares, the noise and the fear.

“I think indigenous people, Navajos, we’ve been pushed around enough. We were forced to live on land no one wanted, (and) now everyone wants it because we’re full of natural resources,” she says. “It’s not right. And so, leave it where it’s at. Leave it where it’s at. That’s what I say.”

Guttierrez’s mom, Sarah Jane White, says Navajo people live where they are born. “Like, if I was born here,” she says, pointing to the ground between her feet, “I would live here. And I would die here. And I would want to be buried here. You don’t leave your homeland.”

That’s why they are fighting, she says. Because what happens now will still matter to the children born here in a century.

***

Forwarded by Leslie Lakind from

Charlotte Levinson, President

The Max & Anna Levinson Foundation
P.O. Box 6309, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87502
505-995-8802  levinsonfoundation.org

Santa Fe Global Water Festival promo video

Santa Fe Global Water Festival promo video

http://youtu.be/uwLmPD6C9ew

 

 

The Magical Grandeur of Water

You are invited to a coming out party, fundraiser evening with pot luck, music and a wonderful presentation to benefit the Santa Fe Global Water Festival. Come join and support us and share with your friends.:
The Magical Grandeur of Water“, a presentation by Jim McMath will take you on a journey from the global to the molecular worlds of water. Fundraiser and coming out party for the Santa Fe Global Water Festival, Friday, December 19th at La Cocina de Balam, 1406 3rd Street, Santa Fe 87505. Pot luck, opening ceremony, music, dance and community from 6 PM – 9 PM.
Lara Bache, Miriam Kass and Sage Gray will be performing songs and spoken word, some about water written for the occasion.
DJ Spunflower and/drumming/jamming/dancing afterwards. By donation
Info:(575) 770 1228 email: HealingTheScars@Gmail.com
www.waterawarenessgroup.wordpress.com/gwf
Please share and invite friends from our FaceBook event page:
www.facebook.com/events/672417426207113/
If you can’t make it pass on to your friends. You can also send us a contribution!!!!

Many blessings,
Raphael Weisman.

The Magical Grandeur of Water

The Magical Grandeur of Water

The Grandeur of Water

“The Grandeur of Water”, a presentation by Jim McMath will take you on a journey from the global to the molecular worlds of water. Fundraiser and coming out party for the Santa Fe Global Water Festival, Friday, December 19th at La Cocina de Balam, 1406 3rd Street, Santa Fe 87505. Pot luck, music, dance and community from 6 PM – 9 PM. DJ/drumming/jamming afterwards. By donation
Info:(575) 770 1228 email: HealingTheScars@Gmail.com
www.waterawarenessgroup.wordpress.com/gwf
Please share. If you can’t make it pass on to your friends. You can also send us a contribution!!!!

Fracking update: Email forward

Subject: for NM citizens to know: WHIPP and area fracking; the scoop
 
from amigos bravos:

Have you seen this one?

http://www.truth-out.org/news/item/24201-will-fracking-cause-our-next-nuclear-disaster

EXCERPT:
“Independent scientists who have reviewed a water analysis
conducted by state authorities of a Texas resident’s drinking
well say the chemical signatures found in the water may provide
“the nation’s first conclusive link” between fracking operations
and aquifer contamination.”

http://www.commondreams.org/headline/2014/06/06-1

‘Conclusive Link’ Between Fracking, Aquifer Contamination Found
in Texas:  Scientists say water samples from Texas man’s well
show identical chemical signatures from nearby gas drilling operations
Jon Queally
June 6, 2014

Parker County homeowner Steve Lipsky demonstrated for local TV
news outlet WFAA how water coming from his underground well can
be ignited. (Credit: WFAA)Independent scientists who have
reviewed a water analysis conducted by state authorities of a
Texas resident’s drinking well say the chemical signatures found
in the water may provide “the nation’s first conclusive link”
between fracking operations and aquifer contamination.

Though a state investigation—conducted by the Texas Railroad
Commission in response to an official complaint filed by
landowner and Parker County resident Steve Lipsky—said it
found the chemical analysis of the water inconclusive, experts
shown the results say the commission was simply wrong. “And not
just by a little,” reports local ABC-affiliate WFAA News who
shared the results with several scientists, “but by a lot.”

Lipsky said he has long believed that nearby hydraulic
fracturing by the Range Resources company was to blame for the
increasing amounts of methane and other chemicals in his
drinking water. Since 2010, he says, growing amounts of methane
have been seeping into the groundwater beneath his land – enough
of it so that he can literally light the water coming out of his
well on fire.

Range Resources says there is no connection between the methane
in Lipsky’s well and their drilling, but scientists shown the
results from the water analysis—specifically one called an
isotopic analysis—say the chemical composition shows they are
an exact match to the gas being fracked at two nearby drilling
sites—called Butler and the Teal—within the Barnett Shale deposit.

“The methane and ethane numbers from the Butler and Teal
production are essentially exactly the same as from Lipsky’s
water well,” said earth scientist Geoffrey Thyne of Wyoming,
who reviewed the data for WFAA. “It tells me that the gas is
the same, and that the gas in Lipsky’s water well was derived
from the Barnett formation.”

And soil scientist Bryce Payne of Pennsylvania—who himself
conducted testing Lipsky’s water in 2013—agreed with that
assessment and told WFAA the gas in Lipsky’s water (referred to
in the state’s report as “well number 8”) is clearly the result
of fracking operations.

“The gas from well number 8 is coming from the Barnett and it’s
coming nearly straight from the Barnett,” Payne said.

Thyne and Payne separately told WFAA that they believe the test
results could represent the nation’s first conclusive link
between fracking and aquifer contamination, even if the state
commission has so far refused to acknowledge the weight of the evidence.

“What we seem to have here is the first good example that that,
in fact, is happening,” said Thyne.

Watch the entire WFAA report as it aired for local Texas
residents on Thursday night:

Correction: An earlier version of this article misstated the
name of the gas company. That error has been corrected.